Tag Archives: Kingdom

virtual insanity

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Sometimes I find myself really caught up in a book I am reading. And what I refer to as caught up, my wife would refer to as obsessed. I have trouble putting it down and I often find myself looking for excuses to get back to it. The book I am referring to currently is called, “Ready Player One” and it is set in the not too distant future and the entire premise is built around virtual reality. I don’t want to give anything away for those who might be interested in reading it, but the reason it is so much fun for me is due to the fact that much of the virtual world is built around 1980’s nostalgia. From Saturday morning cartoons, to TV commercials, to music and movies…it’s got everything. But the hang up in the book for many of the characters is that they often can’t seem to parse out reality from the virtual reality that they often find themselves plugged into. For many of them reality is terrible, as the planet has been depleted of resources through an energy crisis, overpopulation and wars. So their actual day to day existence is pretty terrible. Thus the reason they take comfort in escaping to a place where their problems aren’t always before them.

Don’t get me wrong, but some days I feel like that could be a pretty sweet deal. Lately it feels like my family and many like ours jump from one miniature crisis to the next. Strep throat, flu, house repairs, car troubles, etc…it seems like no one can catch a break. And so we lament our current realities on social media hoping to find solace, or at least compatriots, in the virtual world. It seems like Facebook and the like have become places for that very thing. We log in to these virtual communities and we celebrate our best and lament our worst and for a moment take comfort in the arms of a virtual community. Yet when we are approached in the real world and asked about how we are doing our reply is simply, “pretty good”. Pretty good? It’s almost as if we are forgetting what reality is, or at least what it could be.

Whenever we pray the Lord’s Prayer there is a line that should be incredibly trans-formative when it comes to our realities, “Your kingdom come, Your will be done, on earth as it is in heaven.” – Matthew 6:10. We are literally praying that God’s kingdom become a part of our actions in the world around us today. And yet, when we actually engage with culture around us, all we can manage is a mundane “pretty good” or “fine”. I like that word “mundane”, by the way. The dictionary defines mundane as, “common; ordinary; banal; unimaginative.” And the second definition is even more profound,  “of or relating to this world or earth as contrasted with heaven; worldly; earthly.” If anything, we as believers are called to bring God’s kingdom to this worldly/earthly hemisphere. Our lives should be the opposite of unimaginative. And so maybe perhaps we need to reengage. Maybe we need to realize that although the virtual world can be comforting, it does not bring the Kingdom. And maybe with the apostle Paul we can refocus our energy in the actual world around us, “From now on, brothers and sisters, if anything is excellent and if anything is admirable, focus your thoughts on these things: all that is true, all that is holy, all that is just, all that is pure, all that is lovely, and all that is worthy of praise.” – Philippians‬ ‭4:8.‬ Maybe then we would find comfort in affecting actual reality instead of escaping into the virtual landscape. After all, we have a mission to bring the Kingdom. Maybe it’s time to get plugged in.

 

 

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political

“I usually don’t get too political…” How many times have we seen or heard this phrase from our friends as of late. And what follows is usually some rant or expression intended to bend our ears or our hearts to their cause or stance. And I’m sure it’s pretty much effective 99% of the time, right? It almost seems that every one these days is a political expert and with so many experts it’s mind boggling to think that our society isn’t more healthy. I mean we all know the right answers to fix everything so why isn’t everything fixed?

During Jesus’ days his opponents would often try to find ways of tripping him up or engaging him in some debate. And they didn’t shy away from political discusssions either. At one point they even questioned Him about paying emperial taxes and Jesus’ reply was ingenious. He asked to see a coin, examined the image, and “Then he said to them, “So give back to Caesar what is Caesarʼs, and to God what is Godʼs.””‭‭ -Matthew‬ ‭22:21‬. This has been interpreted a myriad of different ways but it’s probably best thought of in this light. Jesus was saying to his opponents, “Let Caesar have his money and his power and his way of doing things. God has His own way of getting things done.” And that has always been the case. God’s Kingdom does not operate according to the systems, laws, means, and methods of this world…it’s different; an alternative Kingdom.

But so often as of late it seems we in the church have forgotten this. We enter into the political arena with the same tools, the same weapons, the same words as those who are not a part of the church. In his epistle, John puts it this way, “Dear children, let us not love with words or speech but with actions and in truth.” – ‭‭1 John‬ ‭3:18‬. So what does that mean? If you’re pro-life, then be pro-life by adopting babies, supporting foster agencies and single mothers or by sponsoring a child overseas. If you care for the widow, then volunteer at an assisted living facility or find a shut-in to help out. If the homeless tug at your heart then head down to your local mission. If caring for the earth strikes home then start a recycling program and help educate others. If you care for refugees then find a local agency and find out how to volunteer. The Kingdom of God is about action, but not the action that we do often see on display that belongs to Caesar. Our action is love in action and it enacts God’s will on earth as it is in heaven. So what are you waiting for? It’s time to get political. 


shhhhh

Lately I feel as if I am surrounded by noise. And I’m not talking about the loud rambling oilfield trucks that plague our suburban streets. I’m not even referencing the fact that there are four kids in my house who must all have inside voice issues. I’m actually making reference to the multitude of voices in our world today that feel the need to make sure that they are heard, they are understood, they are perceived as being right and that they solicit change. It’s exhausting. It doesn’t matter on which side of which issue someone is speaking about it all has begun to blend together and just become noise…and I’m afraid I have even been guilty of adding to the noise. And so today I say to you and to me…’shhhhhhh’.

Often when I am plagued with some seeming societal ill I try to look to the testimony of Jesus to see how best to address what is going on around me. There are a couple of interactions that Jesus has in the gospels that have always perplexed me. It comes after Jesus has spoken some very unpopular/polarizing words and it doesn’t go over so well (I’m sure none of us can relate to that as of late). The first is in Luke at the beginning of his ministry in Nazareth, “They got up, drove him out of the town, and took him to the brow of the hill on which the town was built, in order to throw him off the cliff. But he walked right through the crowd and went on his way.” – Luke 4:29-30 The other instance takes place in John 8 after Jesus is forced to stand in the way of the religious elite on behalf of a woman caught in adultery and then speaks about His being sent by the Father. “At this, they picked up stones to stone him, but Jesus hid himself, slipping away from the temple grounds.” – John 8:59 Notice what it doesn’t say here, “Jesus kept arguing the point with his opponents until they were forced to concede and admit defeat.” No, in fact, it’s quite the opposite. He realizes the crowd will no longer listen, has gotten past the point of listening and so He walks through their midst. Jesus just steps away. 

Of course Jesus doesn’t walk away and have a pity party. No, Jesus gets back to doing what He does best…enacting the Kingdom of God. In Luke He begins casting out unclean spirits and in John He heals a blind man. Jesus realizes that His argument is best made in enacting that which He is speaking about. There is no greater defense of one’s position than positive Kingdom action that will at once pull you away from pointless arguments and eventually silence your naysayers. Jesus knew this and trusted His work to it. Why? Because He knew the value of silence and He trusted the mission. Here as well we must seek to model Christ of whom we read these words just a short time later in Luke, “ But Jesus often withdrew to lonely places and prayed.” – Luke 5:16 Maybe we need to pull away from the noise. Maybe we need to withdraw. We certainly don’t need to add to it. Maybe it’s time for a little more shhhhh and a lot more action for the Kingdom.


mispackaged

It seems to me that “we the church” have an issue. Now when I say we, I am not simply referring to a local congregation, but to the church as a whole. And perhaps to specify a little more, I probably mean the western church. It seems we have mishandled things a bit. You see, we have been charged with delivering the greatest message on earth. We are ambassadors of the Kingdom of God, Heralds of the Gospel of Jesus Christ and Makers of Disciples for our King…but something has gone awry. This message, this charge has somehow been perceived by the world around us as something that is boring, petty, ineffective, irrelevant, etc. Where did we go wrong?

In the gospel of John, Jesus is speaking about the message of the Kingdom. He refers to himself as the good shepherd and even speaks of the sheep he has not yet brought into the fold that still belong to Him. In this passage he talks about what the message of the kingdom looks like lived out in the life of a believer when he says, “The thief comes only to steal and kill and destroy; I have come that they may have life, and have it to the full.” – John 10:10. Full life! Not simply life that holds onto some distant promise and isn’t fully lived out in the here and now, but full life now. Another way to see this comes from the founder of Methodism John Wesley. “By salvation I mean not barely according to the vulgar notion deliverance from hell or going to heaven but a present deliverance from sin a restoration of the soul to its primitive health its original purity a recovery of the divine nature the renewal of our souls after the image of God in righteousness and true holiness in justice mercy and truth.” In other words God’s salvation isn’t simply something for the age to come, but it is expressly for the world now.

I think this may be where we have mispackaged things a bit. So many of us desperately cling to our hope in the next life that we have forgotten we are called to live out that hope in this life in order that we might share it with those around us. As we grow in holiness we become engaged in acts of justice, mercy and truth in order that we might live out the words of The Lord’s Prayer, “Your Kingdom Come, Your Will be done on earth as it is in heaven.” If we are called to live in this fullest life that God has promised then the world around us should see something captivating, inviting, even enviable. Christians should be the last people on earth who are ever accused of being boring or petty. Our message is too important and our lives are an adventure to be lived out in the Kingdom’s calling…

So my charge to you (and me) today: I implore you to throw off the boring, to free yourself of sin that entangles, to embrace the unknown and live in the freedom of God’s Spirit. To know without a doubt that the life you have been given is the fullest, greatest most inconceivable life imaginable because the forgiveness and The Spirit you have received came from the Divine life that spoke all life into existence. May you know the message you have within you is greater than any word or story every spoken and share that life as if all life depends on it…because it does. Now go and be the image bearers of Christ in a world that desperately needs to see Him and the life He has offered.


prepared

Don’t you just love it when someone tells you there are only 48 days left until Christmas. The countdown to Christmas used to be so exciting as a kid. But as an adult, well…it’s still fun, it just comes with a little baggage. There are even those moments where you almost seize up a bit because you know you aren’t prepared (admit it, when you saw the day tally above this was you). And you would think it might be easier in the church because we have an entire season dedicated to preparation, but this holiday and all it entails still seems to take us by storm.

In the church calendar the time we are entering into is referred to as Advent (It begins November 30th this year). And Advent is the season of welcoming/ushering in God’s Kingdom through the celebration of Jesus’ birth. It is a season literally built around preparation…and yet it is often the season where we feel the least prepared. On Wednesday nights our youth group is going through a series on the three parables found in Matthew 25. These parables are all about Advent and the ushering in of God’s present and coming kingdom. The first of these is the parable of the Ten Virgins; five wise and five foolish. The difference between the two is that the five wise had framed their lives around preparation and had brought with them extra oil in their anticipation of the bridegrooms arrival. The foolish virgins, although ready and excited for the bridegrooms arrival found themselves ill-prepared and shut out of the wedding feast. The parable ends with the verse, “Therefore keep watch, because you do not know the day or the hour”. Matthew 25:13

I think this speaks to the idea of being ready versus being prepared. Here’s a little personal illustration to further elucidate. I recently ran the Detroit Half Marathon for Team World Vision. And although I considered myself ready (I had registered, bought nice shoes, got there on time…) I was far from prepared. I had not put in the adequate training time to make the experience all it could have been. I think it’s that way with the five foolish virgins. They were ready for the Bridegrooms return, but they weren’t prepared. It wasn’t a part of their DNA. They didn’t think to buy extra oil because it wasn’t a part of everything they did. Anticipating the Kingdom of God should be a part of who we are and not just something we “get ready” for.

So I’m thinking a bit different about Advent this year. Is the celebration and enacting of the present and coming Kingdom a part of me every day or is it something I just celebrate once a year? And I think that if we are constantly being prepared we will start to see the Kingdom ushered in a lot more often than just during Advent. After all, The Kingdom of God is at hand.


connectivity

So this week I had the privilege of getting to perform a tune-up on our 2004 Dodge Grand Caravan. I say privilege due to the fact that I am amazed that my wife ever lets me tinker with anything under the hood of either of our cars. But hers had been idling roughly and even almost died on her, so I think she was desperate. Early into this operation I could tell that it was going to be a doozy. But I followed all the instructions I received off of YouTube and seemed to get through it okay. Even though I was so nervous about the wire connections to the spark plugs. What if I didn’t get them in the right order? What if the connections are too loose? Will the car blow up? Will my wife consequently kill me? But I am happy to say that all is well in Dodge Caravan land…she’s purring like a kitten (the car that is).

But that got me thinking about connections. Just last week with our students we were talking about how we, as a church, could transform Flint and the culture around us. And we brainstormed program and service ideas and then one of my leaders pointed out a very simple and yet profound truth. In the midst of all of our scheming and planning it is essential that we stay connected to God. We have to be in the Bible, we have to be praying…otherwise all of our efforts are either a) useless or b) ineffective and we will eventually run out of steam. One of my favorite passages of scripture puts it this way, “Remain in me, as I also remain in you. No branch can bear fruit by itself; it must remain in the vine. Neither can you bear fruit unless you remain in me. I am the vine; you are the branches. If you remain in me and I in you, you will bear much fruit; apart from me you can do nothing.” – John 15:4-5 There is something key to our efforts and our connectivity to God.

Back to the car for a bit. The spark plugs I put in are brand spanking new and so are the wires. They are the perfect implements for powering that lovely 3.3L 6 cylinder engine (albeit an old engine). But if they aren’t connected or even just partially connected, they will fail miserably and all of a sudden I may have to rely on Flintstones power to get said Dodge Caravan from point A to point B. And I think it’s the same way with our Kingdom efforts. If we aren’t connected to the vine, if we aren’t intimately connected to God we will just be spinning our wheels. So may you renew your connection; even strengthen your connectivity in order to effectively bring the Kingdom of God to those around you.

 

 


death to cynicism

This morning as I was pouring over my Twitter feed I noticed something aside from all of the tweeted pleas of school cancellations. I have a lot of cynical voices pouring into my life. Granted, most days I will read a lot of these updates, resonate with them and go on with my day, but today was different. Often times I can get behind the cynicism of the people I follow because I find myself to be cynical as well. After all, I am part of the generation raised on X-Files…”Trust no one”. And I like to think of myself as part of the “mosaic” or “millennial” generation of the church that is seeking change for the good of the Kingdom. But it seems to me that often this “change” that is being spoken of is being ushered in all wrong. Don’t get me wrong, I don’t always like some of the main stream methods of doing church or interpreting the Bible or even how Christianity is depicted to the masses, but is cynicism the only way?

In his letter to the church in Ephesus the apostle Paul writes, “Do not let any unwholesome talk come out of your mouths, but only what is helpful for building others up according to their needs, that it may benefit those who listen.” – Ephesians 4:29. I have always loved this verse. And for the longest time I thought it referred to “coarse joking” or “harsh language”, but I think I have found that it really applies more to the disease of cynicism running rampant in some of the young leading voices in the world today. The word the writer uses for unwholesome is sapros. And it most commonly is defined as being rotten or putrid, but it can also mean corrupted by age or worn out. My problem with cynical talk is it is corrupted…worn out. Anyone can be cynical. Really! There is even a school of philosophy (and I know I am going to oversymplify this so forgive me all of my philosophical and theological brethren) called deconstructionism. And the gist of it is to tear down existing paradigms to get down to the root of what is being espoused. But the problem is they rarely have a better alternative.

And I think that is my problem with cynicism in general. It is very easy to tear down existing systems and paradigms. It takes a lot more creativity and work to provide a better alternative. But isn’t that what we are called to do. What comes out of our mouths is meant to be helpful and to build others up around us. Not alienate and destroy them. And that really is what the Kingdom of God is all about. Maybe if we learn to take on speech that is reflective of a hopeful eternal kingdom we would begin to see fruits in a new way. Jesus put it this way, “The kingdom of heaven is like a mustard seed, which a man took and planted in his field. Though it is the smallest of all seeds, yet when it grows, it is the largest of garden plants and becomes a tree, so that the birds come and perch in its branches.” (Matthew 13:31-32) This is the fruit of Kingdom speech and life.

So I say Death to Cynicism. May our speech, posts, tweets, texts, etc. reflect the hope to which we have been called. And may we speak life into those around us for the sake of Christ who gave his life for us!


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