Tag Archives: Blessing

brand new eyes

Eleven years and three hundred fifty-six days ago I saw these eyes for the very first time (you have to take into account the gotcha day). We walked into an office building and were eventually greeted by four pounds fourteen ounces of wonder that would forever change our lives. People often say to us that we must have been such a blessing to our son to do what we did through adoption, but honestly…it is so much more the other way around. Jonas is a joy. Not only did he give me the gift of being a father for the first time, but he has enriched my life with laughter, wonder, imagination, excitement, and more. But one of the gifts that he has given me that is rarely spoken about is the new eyes through which I see society and culture. I grew up in a middle class evangelical white household. Most of my relationships existed within that same paradigm. But all of a sudden I was thrown into the world of understanding what it meant to see the world through the African American experience because my son is African American.

Now that statement might seem simple at face value and a little redundant. But it is actually quite weighted. I realized it was imperative for me to educate myself more on the black experience in America throughout history. It was important for me to understand black culture and understand all of the nuances of what it means to live as a young black man in twenty-first century America because my son is black. He will be perceived and judged in ways that I have never been perceived and judged just because of the color of his skin; period. And so, because I love him, I was given a new set of eyes through which to see the world through. And honestly, this is the cruciform way of living for us Christians. We are called to lay down our lives, our experiences, our worldviews, our bias, our preconceived notions for the sake of the other. When Paul set about to describe what Christ did for us in doing this he first says, “Instead of each person watching out for their own good, watch out for what is better for others.” – Philippians‬ ‭2:4‬ ‭And how do we watch out for each others’ interest until we know what each others’ experience is first like?

I’ve been extremely fortunate in my familial experience. I have a son who is black. I have a son who is Latino. I have a son who is mixed race. Just by the sheer makeup of my family I get to see the world differently. The way I view so much in the world has changed because of them. But this is not the case for most of you. You will have to work to find friends who are different than you (and I don’t mean that they cheer for another sports team). But it is so important that you befriend people of a different race, religion, country, etc. And that you allow the way you view the world to change because of those relationships. If you still hold to the exact same biases, preferences, and lenses that you have had all your life, then it is time to reexamine your experience for the sake of Christ. After all, we are called to lay down all of that for the sake of the kingdom. “If anyone comes to me and does not hate father and mother, wife and children, brothers and sisters—yes, even their own life—such a person cannot be my disciple.” – Luke 14:26 So may we reexamine our relationships. May we lay down who we have been. And may we get some brand new eyes for one another, for the world and ultimately for the Kingdom of God.

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thanks-excess

barbecue-barbeque-bbq-161640

I’d like to paraphrase a recent conversation between my mother and I. “So we’ll have a ham.” “You mean we’re not going to have turkey?” “Well, I wasn’t planning on preparing one. Your uncle usually does that but this is just going to be our immediate family.” “You mean we’re not going to have turkey?” “I mean, if you want to prepare it, I will pick one up.” “For the love of all things holy mom, pick up a turkey. I’ll gladly prepare it.” I mean, after all, it is Thanksgiving. And what is Thanksgiving without the turkey or the stuffing or the green beans or the mashed potatoes or the mac-and-cheese or the pecan pie or the pumpkin pie or any of the other excessive dishes that we stuff around our tables to stuff our selves with all around a holiday we call Thanksgiving…yeish. Don’t get me wrong. I love to overeat as much as the next guy, but something seems amiss if this is what we refer to as Thanksgiving.

Thanksgiving is a worship term after all. In the Hebrew scriptures we first hear about Thanksgiving as a means of returning thanks to YHWH for that which He had blessed Israel with. And blessing, original blessing even, in the Hebrew scriptures was always predicated upon blessing received, blessing bestowed. Israel would be blessed as long as Israel became a blessing to others. This goes all the way back to the inception of the people of Israel in Genesis 12 when God says to Abram, “I will bless those who bless you, and whoever curses you I will curse; and all peoples on earth will be blessed through you.” I think sometimes we get stuck on the cursing part and forget to read the rest of the text, “…all peoples on earth will be blessed through you.” All peoples; everybody will be blessed because of this promise of God’s presence in the life of Abram and his descendants. Think about that for a minute. God established His presence, His blessing in the lives of a particular people so that the entirety of the planet would know that same blessing.

And yet here we are today. In a time of fear and supposed scarcity for resources or jobs or things or whatever it might be. In a recent essay entitled, The Liturgy of Abundance, The Myth of Scarcity, Biblical scholar and theologian Walter Brueggemann had this to say, “Wouldn’t it be wonderful if liberal and conservative church people, who love to quarrel with each other, came to a common realization that the real issue confronting us is whether the news of God’s abundance can be trusted in the face of the story of scarcity? What we know in the secret recesses of our hearts is that the story of scarcity is a tale of death. And the people of God counter this tale by witnessing to the manna. There is a more excellent bread than crass materialism. It is the bread of life and you don’t have to bake it.” You don’t have to bake it…but you do have to trust in it, lean into and and become more generous and giving as a result of it. Mahatma Gandhi once said, “The world has enough for everyone’s need, but not enough for everyone’s greed.” So maybe this season we think a little differently about Thanksgiving. Maybe instead of just being thankful for the things we have, maybe we learn to be thankful for the things we can give.


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