Tag Archives: African-American

brand new eyes

Eleven years and three hundred fifty-six days ago I saw these eyes for the very first time (you have to take into account the gotcha day). We walked into an office building and were eventually greeted by four pounds fourteen ounces of wonder that would forever change our lives. People often say to us that we must have been such a blessing to our son to do what we did through adoption, but honestly…it is so much more the other way around. Jonas is a joy. Not only did he give me the gift of being a father for the first time, but he has enriched my life with laughter, wonder, imagination, excitement, and more. But one of the gifts that he has given me that is rarely spoken about is the new eyes through which I see society and culture. I grew up in a middle class evangelical white household. Most of my relationships existed within that same paradigm. But all of a sudden I was thrown into the world of understanding what it meant to see the world through the African American experience because my son is African American.

Now that statement might seem simple at face value and a little redundant. But it is actually quite weighted. I realized it was imperative for me to educate myself more on the black experience in America throughout history. It was important for me to understand black culture and understand all of the nuances of what it means to live as a young black man in twenty-first century America because my son is black. He will be perceived and judged in ways that I have never been perceived and judged just because of the color of his skin; period. And so, because I love him, I was given a new set of eyes through which to see the world through. And honestly, this is the cruciform way of living for us Christians. We are called to lay down our lives, our experiences, our worldviews, our bias, our preconceived notions for the sake of the other. When Paul set about to describe what Christ did for us in doing this he first says, “Instead of each person watching out for their own good, watch out for what is better for others.” – Philippians‬ ‭2:4‬ ‭And how do we watch out for each others’ interest until we know what each others’ experience is first like?

I’ve been extremely fortunate in my familial experience. I have a son who is black. I have a son who is Latino. I have a son who is mixed race. Just by the sheer makeup of my family I get to see the world differently. The way I view so much in the world has changed because of them. But this is not the case for most of you. You will have to work to find friends who are different than you (and I don’t mean that they cheer for another sports team). But it is so important that you befriend people of a different race, religion, country, etc. And that you allow the way you view the world to change because of those relationships. If you still hold to the exact same biases, preferences, and lenses that you have had all your life, then it is time to reexamine your experience for the sake of Christ. After all, we are called to lay down all of that for the sake of the kingdom. “If anyone comes to me and does not hate father and mother, wife and children, brothers and sisters—yes, even their own life—such a person cannot be my disciple.” – Luke 14:26 So may we reexamine our relationships. May we lay down who we have been. And may we get some brand new eyes for one another, for the world and ultimately for the Kingdom of God.

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better than

Yesterday morning I had the privilege to gather with ministers from around Odessa, TX as we met for our monthly ministerial alliance meeting. However, this meeting was unlike any that I had attended before as we had set the agenda to discuss race relations in Odessa and how we as the church were addressing these issues. We set around and heard stories from Latino, African-American and Native American ministers and how the church was doing in regards towards racial-reconciliation and healing of historic and systemic wounds. Much of the conversation seemed to be framed around how our differences ultimately shouldn’t divide, but lead to conversation which should lead to understanding which would ultimately lead to healing. And many of us concluded that a large part of the problem is that often these conversations aren’t happening in churches not out of fear or hatred, but rather indifference or apathy…which might actually be worse. What is it about our current situation or way of life that keeps us from approaching, conversing or even relating to each other?

Sometimes in the church, maybe specifically the Church of the Nazarene, we struggle with this on an even grander scale. You see, those of us who believe in Holiness doctrine believe that God does something special through a second (or continued) work of grace through the Holy Spirit. In this work on God’s part we believe that God does away with our sin-nature or our desire to sin and leads us to living more Christ-like lives. However sometimes this work on God’s part becomes a thing that we think we have done on our part and we forget who we were and who we still are apart from grace. In his first letter to his young protege, the apostle Paul put it this way, “Here is a trustworthy saying that deserves full acceptance: Christ Jesus came into the world to save sinners—of whom I am the worst. But for that very reason I was shown mercy so that in me, the worst of sinners, Christ Jesus might display his immense patience as an example for those who would believe in him and receive eternal life.” – 1 Timothy 1:15-16 Of whom I am the worst? I’m not sure Paul minced words about who he thought of himself in regards to his condition. And yet…he was Paul.

I think about what this should say about us and how we relate to people who aren’t like us. I think sometimes it is easier to relate to those who look like us, dress like us, behave like us, smell like us, the list could go on forever. And yet God has called us to relate His story of grace to those we come into contact with regardless of their situation because in God’s eyes…in Paul’s eyes…we really are no different. So there isn’t any space for feelings of superiority in our Spirituality or our piety because at the end of the day, we didn’t save ourselves and it’s only by the grace of God that we are even able to be partners in God’s saving work. So maybe today we should cast aside our indifference, our apathy, our piety or anything else that makes us feel distant from those around us and lavishly extend God’s grace as it was once lavishly bestowed upon us.


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