Category Archives: evil

trick or treat

woman-hand-girl-professional

One of my favorite events in the life of our church here in Odessa took place last night. For one night each year we roll out the red, or should I say orange, carpet in a big way. Our annual Fall Festival is awesome! We have about 50 or so volunteers rally to host over 500 people each year. There’s food trucks, inflatables, face-painting, carnival games, pop-corn, music and costumes…so many cool costumes. I love seeing all of the kids, and “adult kids”, coming to our church in their costumes for a night of fun and festivities. In fact, it seems that more and more each year people are really getting into the Halloween spirit. And yet, sometimes we in the church struggle with what to do with this holiday full of spooks and ghosts and ghouls.

I guess we could start by taking a look at our own history, after all, Halloween began as part of Allhallowtide, a Christian feast holiday. According to HistoryChannel.com, “In the eighth century, Pope Gregory III designated November 1 as a time to honor all saints; All Saints Day…The evening before was known as All Hallows Eve, and later Halloween.” Halloween was originally part of a Religious feast intended to honor those who have gone before us. And yet so often we see all of the hullabaloo of Halloween today feeling like something different from it’s Christian roots and often become something else entirely. Even as I am writing this I am thinking about all of those who feel like Halloween is a dark holiday to be avoided at all costs…and I respect your opinion, but think with me for a moment. Try putting yourself in the place of one of the kids who got be at our Fall Festival last night or who looks forward to Trick-or-Treating this coming week. You’re telling me that for a day I get to dress up like someone else, go around to my neighbor’s houses and they give me candy? It’s almost kind of magical. And who doesn’t love another excuse to eat candy?

I have always looked at scripture a little differently and I hope you will amuse me here. To me, one of the saddest verses in all of scripture is found in I Corinthians 13:11 “When I was a child, I talked like a child, I thought like a child, I reasoned like a child. When I became a man, I put the ways of childhood behind me.” So often we think of this as the natural maturation process, but what if it is talking about the loss of the natural wonder and love that comes with childhood? I think all to often we are ready to grow up and we miss the joy and simplicity of living that can be seen through the eyes of a child. Maybe if we began to see this holiday again through the eyes of a child and all the joy I saw last night we might be able to see it a little differently. Maybe the treat is found through the trick of seeing Halloween as a child. And maybe holidays like Halloween can be enjoyed in a new light as we seek to reclaim the world yet again through childlike wonder and joy.

 

 

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root deep

I submit for the jury that tooth/mouth pain has to be one of the worst pains a human can experience. Maybe I am just being a baby about it, but owwww! What did people do before modern dentistry and endodontics?

This past week I found out that I had a horrible infection just below one of my molars. That infection was pressing upon my tooth and basically reducing me to a babbling three-year old. At first I thought the tooth ache could be sinus related as it started prior to the weekend and my wife and daughter had just been sick. But as it grew more severe over the weekend (and my whining increased) my wife insisted that I go and see our favorite local dentist. After seeing me and my x-ray for all of five minutes I was sent to a local endodontist, who proceeded to drill into said tooth in order to correct the previous root canal and treat the infection. All that to say…Ouch! Who knew such debilitating pain could be derived from one tooth infection? I can’t imagine going through this prior to the modern era of Novocaine and Tylenol-3. That root, or rather that root infection was enough to take me out of commission completely (not that it necessarily takes much, but you get the point).

In his letter to young Timothy (I think Timothy is one of those people we think about in the Bible as being perpetually young), Paul makes mention of “root theory”, as I will call it. In 1 Timothy 6:9-10 he writes, “But those who want to be rich fall into temptation and are trapped by many senseless and harmful desires that plunge people into ruin and destruction. For the love of money is a root of all kinds of evil, and in their eagerness to be rich some have wandered away from the faith and pierced themselves with many pains.” And most of us have heard that adage before, “the love of money is the root of all evil”, but Paul says it slightly different. The desire for wealth is the root of all kinds of evil. Still seems pretty expansive though.

After experiencing that all encompassing effects of root damage I think I have started to understand what Paul is speaking about here. Granted, Paul probably had very little dental knowledge, but he had to understand a little bit of botany to make the reference. My tooth was completely rendered ineffective and useless because of it’s root issue (to this moment it is still pretty useless). Most plants, if the root is shot, whither and die pretty quickly. Likewise if our lives become consumed with the growth and acquisition of wealth we become virtually ineffective. I have seen some amazing Christians become consumed by their desire for more and fall away from an amazing calling on their life, Jesus even said in Matthew 16:26, “What good will it be for someone to gain the whole world, yet forfeit their soul?”

So I guess we need to examine our root desires. Are they infected? Are our root desires reflective of Christ or are they driven at something else? I can tell you from recent experience that infected roots don’t stay hidden forever and eventually they may even ruin us.


cast the villain

It has been said that everyone loves a villain. And you know its true. All of a sudden someone enters the stage onto whom we can project all of our darkness. We can loathe them and we are completely justified. They are a villain and there demise is the ultimate justification played out before us. The problem is that all to often in life we believe that villains in the form of people around us and we are all to eager to cast all of our darkness onto them in order to separate ourselves from their wickedness in order to justify our righteousness. But villains are characters and they are fictitious. How do I know this?

The apostle Paul wrote, “For our struggle is not against flesh and blood, but against the rulers, against the authorities, against the powers of this dark world and against the spiritual forces of evil in the heavenly realms.” (Ephesians 4:12) So if our struggle is not against flesh and blood then there are really no villains. Yes there are people who have given into the darkness and perform evil acts, but our fight is not with them, but rather with the systems of violence, sin and death that have captured their hearts.

Then why do we alienate, villainize and condemn those who commit sin. Because sometimes it is easier to cast the villain than it is to participate in their redemption. And sometimes if we find someone who is in a darker place than us, then we are able to paint ourselves in greater light. Maybe instead we need to be reminded that we were all at one time or another enemies of the cross and take on the mission of reclaiming those who are lost…rather than casting them as the villain.

 

* This blog sparked this line of thought…a great read: http://donmilleris.com/2011/02/22/how-a-consumer-thinks/


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